fandomsandfeminism:

mossmallow:

katybuglove:

Okay, can we talk about this scene for a minute? I’m sorry if this has been mentioned, but I have a lot of feels, so I need to spew them in a word vomit. 
This is the scene in Lilo and Stitch when Nani’s come to the realization that she cannot take care of Lilo without a job, and she’s losing the last of her family. 
She sings the song “Aloha O’e”. Which is a fairly familiar song for most people, even if you’ve never been to Hawaii. Now I had no idea the significance of this song other than the song had the word “aloha” and it means goodbye. 
This is where it attacks you with feels. In case you didn’t know, Hawaii used to be a monarchy. And this song was written by their last Queen, QueenLiliʻuokalani when she was imprisoned and before her country was taken away: 

…Another of her compositions was Aloha Oe, a song she had written previously and transcribed during her confinement. In her writings, she says “At first I had no instrument, and had to transcribe the notes by voice alone; but I found, notwithstanding disadvantages, great consolation in composing, and transcribed a number of songs. Three found their way from my prison to the city of Chicago, where they were printed, among them the “Aloha Oe” or “Farewell to Thee,” which became a very popular song”. Originally written as a lovers’ good-bye, the song came to be regarded as a symbol of, and lament for, the loss of her country.

So this song is her lament of losing her country to invaders and outsiders because she was unable to take care of it. 
Just like Nani was unable to take care of Lilo. 
Nani who grew up learning about the proud heritage of Hawaii and their monarchy and their queen. She not only feels failure as a sister and guardian, but also as a Hawaiian. She’s not able to protect what is hers from outsiders. Someone has come, yet again, with legal prescient to take away what she should have taken care of. 
I must say, Disney, this is how you do cultural significance. This is how you pay homage. This is how you do respect. 
AND I JUST HAVE SO MANY FEELS. 

as a hawaiian, it makes me really happy to know that you understand how significant that song was.

Disney occasionally does it right. There is so much right with Lilo and Stitch. 

fandomsandfeminism:

mossmallow:

katybuglove:

Okay, can we talk about this scene for a minute? I’m sorry if this has been mentioned, but I have a lot of feels, so I need to spew them in a word vomit. 

This is the scene in Lilo and Stitch when Nani’s come to the realization that she cannot take care of Lilo without a job, and she’s losing the last of her family. 

She sings the song “Aloha O’e”. Which is a fairly familiar song for most people, even if you’ve never been to Hawaii. Now I had no idea the significance of this song other than the song had the word “aloha” and it means goodbye. 

This is where it attacks you with feels. In case you didn’t know, Hawaii used to be a monarchy. And this song was written by their last Queen, QueenLiliʻuokalani when she was imprisoned and before her country was taken away: 

…Another of her compositions was Aloha Oe, a song she had written previously and transcribed during her confinement. In her writings, she says “At first I had no instrument, and had to transcribe the notes by voice alone; but I found, notwithstanding disadvantages, great consolation in composing, and transcribed a number of songs. Three found their way from my prison to the city of Chicago, where they were printed, among them the “Aloha Oe” or “Farewell to Thee,” which became a very popular song”. Originally written as a lovers’ good-bye, the song came to be regarded as a symbol of, and lament for, the loss of her country.

So this song is her lament of losing her country to invaders and outsiders because she was unable to take care of it. 

Just like Nani was unable to take care of Lilo. 

Nani who grew up learning about the proud heritage of Hawaii and their monarchy and their queen. She not only feels failure as a sister and guardian, but also as a Hawaiian. She’s not able to protect what is hers from outsiders. Someone has come, yet again, with legal prescient to take away what she should have taken care of. 

I must say, Disney, this is how you do cultural significance. This is how you pay homage. This is how you do respect. 

AND I JUST HAVE SO MANY FEELS. 

as a hawaiian, it makes me really happy to know that you understand how significant that song was.

Disney occasionally does it right. There is so much right with Lilo and Stitch. 

(Source: lovelyladykaty, via hardcorefandomer)

castiel-knight-of-hell:

sandraugiga:

castiel-knight-of-hell:

sandraugiga:

castiel-knight-of-hell:

sandraugiga:


Not sure if Dean killed the father of Cole. Just look at the father, and then look at Dean. The father has A LOT of blood. Of course this happens when you have you throat cut, you start bleeding all over the place. Now I know Dean is a good killer, but the only blood he has on him is on his knife. Dean is totally clean in this scene. Shouldn’t he at least have SOME blood on him?

a trained killer knows where to stand to avoid the spray of blood. We’ve seen Dean and Sam stab lots of people without getting any blood stains. I’ve watched true crime shows where they demonstrate how a killer stood when stabbing someone to avoid the blood. Yes, neck wounds spray a lot but it sprays in a predictable direction, I’ve seen demonstrations of how killers can position themselves to avoid getting blood stains. They still get hit with microscopic blood splatter but that can’t be seen with the naked eye

You are totally right. However, we as the viewer never got to see the murder, we only got some grunts and things falling. Added to the visually clean Dean, there is a possibility that he has not done the deed, and Cole just assumes it is Dean. He would never contemplate that there might be another creature there, because he only learned that there are supernatural creatures like Demons in Reichenbach. It would be normal to assume that Dean did it, because he does have a blood stained knife and in the real world that is how it works. You see a bloody person and then suddenly there is a guy standing there with a bloodstained knife, you automatically assume that he is the murderer, even if you have not witnesses the murder yourself.

Maybe I have just seen too many detective shows to automatically assume that this is always the case. And storytelling would be boring if things were so cut and clear….

You’re absolutely right. We don’t know for sure if Dean killed Cole’s dad, or if John did it, or if a monster did it and Cole’s dad was someone Dean was trying to save. The scene was presented in a way that they wanted the viewer to assume that Dean had killed the man because he was a monster. But it’s true that we don’t have all the facts and they might be throwing a twist at us

Personally, I hope that doesn’t happen because i think the original assumption, that Dean killed Cole’s dad who was a monster, would make for the more compelling story. If it turns out that John killed him, or that Cole’s dad was a victim of a monster, it means that Dean is off the hook because Cole would no longer be justified in wanting him dead. But if Dean had killed Cole’s father because he was a monster that opens up this great plot-line of Dean and Cole dealing with the aftermath.

Cole considers himself a good guy trying to take down a bad guy. If he found out that his father was actually a monster then that means Dean isn’t a bad guy. Cole would have to make the choice between walking away as the good guy he is, or going to the dark side by continuing to seek out revenge on someone who was saving innocent lives. I think it’d also give Dean (once he’s no longer so demonic) an interesting story-line of thinking about the people he encounters on hunts. He leaves them behind and moves on but the things Dean does on hunts will effect people in profound ways. We’ve seen a few examples of people from Dean’s past being grateful for what he did but we’ve never seen someone like Cole who’s life got worse after Dean killed a monster

It is not totally true that we as the viewers have not seen someone who´s life has gotten worse after Dean came to town to be a hero. Remember Repo Man in season 7? (I freaking love that episode by the way, it was a total mindfuck with destiel thrown in…)

Otherwise, good points. ~nods happily~

I love Repo Man too :). Jeffery’s life did get worse after Sam and Dean helped him but let’s look at the reasons why

Jeffery: They patched me up, mostly. But I lost my job, my health insurance.  I just started to drink and drift, and I got lost. Had some kind of mental break. And I started to talk… about what happened.
Dean: So, let me guess. Drunk tank to psych eval to 72-hour forced hold to a nice long stay at an institution of their choice.

The physical injuries caused Jeffery some problems but he attributed the majority of his down-slide to his mental state. At the time we were to assume it was due to PTSD but by the end of the episode we know he wasn’t traumatized by the demon, he was depressed because he missed the demon. That means Dean and Sam helping Jeffery didn’t ruin his life, his life was ruined because he had the mind of a serial killer and he missed his demon so much he couldn’t cope

Cole is a good guy trying to be a hero and his life was changed for the worse the night Dean Winchester showed up in his house. I can’t think of any time we’ve had a character like that

I’m so happy I read all that

(via pernilongo-da-malasia)